Zelensky Visits Troops in Bakhmut as Russians Assault

Putin visits troops in Rostov-on-Don as holiday shoppers assault

B Kean

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Photo by Andrey Konstantinov on Unsplash

President Vladimir Zelensky, before traveling to the United States to speak before the U.S. Congress, was seen in what he called the “hottest spot on the entire frontline:” Bakhmut. As Zelensky met with the troops and handed out well-deserved awards, explosions in the distance could be heard.

President Volodymyr Zelensky’s unannounced visit on Tuesday to Bakhmut to rally the soldiers there was perhaps his most daring visit to the front lines since Russia invaded Ukraine, and a demonstration of defiance in the face of Moscow’s ceaseless assault against the ravaged eastern city (Zelensky’s Visit to Bakhmut).

The Russian military command wants Bakhmut more than anything right now. Wrecked beyond recognition, the town holds very little military value but the loss of life on the Russian side has been so steep that it almost seems like Russia is now obsessed with that piece of earth — they were known to make such mistakes in World War II.

For a plot of land the size of the average super Walmart in the U.S., it is estimated that 260,000 Russian troops died in a two-year period. Known as the “Nevsky Pyatochok,” it was believed that if a bridgehead could be established there, the siege of Leningrad could be ended.

Bakhmut has become the Nevsky Pyatchok. Russian military planners, like the Soviet ones before them, seem to think that the city will play a big role in the spring offensives.

While Russian forces are digging in and establishing more fortified defensive positions across much of the 600-mile front, they have continued to assault Bakhmut from multiple directions. They have suffered heavy losses and there have been widespread reports of low morale and disorder in the Russian ranks, with convicts recruited to fight clashing with other units (Zelensky’s Visit to Bakhmut).

In the middle of all of that hell, the President, who is the Commander-in-Chief of the Ukrainian armed forces, shows up to cheer his fighters on. How that must of enraged a lot of people in Moscow, especially one little tyrant who prefers to hide in underground bunkers and sit at 100-foot-long tables for fear of…

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B Kean

The past holds the answers to today’s problems. “Be curious, not judgmental,” at least until you have all the facts. Think and stop watching cable news.