In Fifty Years, Russia’s Population Will Dip Below 100 million

Human evolution always finds a balance as Russia’s stupidity threatens to push the country to the brink of irrelevance

B Kean

--

Courtesy of Newsweek

Take a look at that face. Yes, I was thinking the same thing: Grinch-like, right? He is similar in many ways to the Grinch, but that is not why I asked you to go against the natural impulse to avert your eyes from this demon. Look again, please. You are seeing the reason why Russia, by 2090, will be demographically irrelevant.

It is estimated that Russia’s population will fall to about 132 million in the next two decades. The United Nations has predicted that in a worst-case scenario, by the start of the next century, Russia’s population could almost halve to 83 million, Newsweek previously reported.

If you come from a country with a population under 20 million, for example, you think that 132 million, even 83 million, is a lot of people. I agree. If you put that amount of people into Estonia, then the tiny but feisty Baltic nation would quickly become Gaza-like in terms of population density. Russia has a landmass that spans 11 percent of the Earth’s surface or 17.1 million square kilometers. Estonia is 45,000 square kilometers.

Nothing Russia does today promotes population growth. The initiatives under Putin to reward families having children did not spark the hope-for population boom. In addition, Russia’s racist immigration policies, which discourage the immigration of non-whites and non-Europeans, have only created gaping holes in Russia’s manual labor force.

Two examples of how Russia’s anti-Southern immigration policies have negatively affected the country can be seen in the farmer’s markets, which stand half-empty, resulting in less competition and much higher prices at the markets; and during the winter, when cities used to rely on the cheap labor from the Soviet Union’s former southern republics, sidewalks and rooftops are not being sufficiently cleared of snow.

Moscow always has money because it is the capital, but even in St. Petersburg, walking through the city during the winter can be very dangerous (I suffered torn muscles in both shoulders as a result of hard falls on the city’s…

--

--

B Kean

The past holds the answers to today’s problems. “Be curious, not judgmental,” at least until you have all the facts. Think and stop watching cable news.